Call for Submissions: Eurynome

Eurynome is now open for submissions!  Check them out below!

 

Eurynome publishes speculative fiction on a rolling basis. To ensure that everyone is on the same page, the following is a broad definition that Eurynome embraces:

Speculative fiction is an umbrella term encompassing the more fantastical fiction genres, specifically science fiction, fantasy, horror fiction, weird fiction, supernatural fiction, superhero fiction, utopian and dystopian fiction, apocalyptic and post-apocalyptic fiction, and alternate history in literature.

Clearly, speculative fiction includes a wide array of genres with varying gradients of fantasy and realism. We invite stories that make the reader think, not cringe. Please send your excessively gory or sexually explicit stories to a different magazine. However, we do like humor.

Eurynome gives special attention to pieces that retell old stories or myths for a modern audience, though a well-written fiction piece outside of those measures can find a home here. Please keep in mind that Eurynome is a digital publication, and therefore your submitted work should be convenient for on-screen reading. Don’t let unwieldy paragraphs damage the flow of your story.

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We do not accept simultaneous submissions or reprints, and please only submit one story at a time. If your finished story can already be found online (even on your personal blog) then unfortunately we do not wish to publish it. At this time, we are unable to monetarily compensate authors, but we hope to change that in the future.

If your story is accepted, congratulations! We will let you know when to expect your piece online. If we offer to publish your piece, Eurynome claims first world electronic rights. This means we reserve the right to be the first place to feature the story online, though you may submit it for subsequent reprints to other digital and physical publications that wish to accept it. You also retain your audio rights to the story.

If you receive a rejection, it may (but not always) include feedback on how the piece fell short. In some cases, we may invite you to resubmit after evaluating our feedback. Otherwise, however, please do not submit the same story again.

Before your story is published, we reserve the right to make minor (mostly cosmetic) edits. Any large edits will be sent to the author before publication for their feedback.

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FLASH FICTION

Eurynome accepts flash fiction, which is defined as a fiction piece between 500 and 1,000 words.

If you wish to submit a piece to the magazine, please send an e-mail to submissions@euryno.me, and attach a .rtf or .doc file containing your story in manuscript format. For the subject line, write:

[FLASH FICTION SUBMISSION: author name – story title]

In the body of the email, please include a short (2-3 sentences) biography about yourself, including a link to your website and/or your Twitter handle. Please also include an approximate word count, and tell us how you found our journal.

The average response time for flash fiction is under a week, but is usually quicker. If you do not receive a response after one month, please send a follow-up e-mail. Stories are read and responded to in the order they are received.

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SHORT STORIES

A short story is defined as a fiction piece between 1,001 and 7,500 words.

If you wish to submit a piece to the magazine, please send an e-mail to submissions@euryno.me, and attach a .rtf or .doc file containing your story in manuscript format. For the subject line, write:

[SHORT STORY SUBMISSION: author name – story title]

In the body of the email, please include a short (2-3 sentences) biography about yourself, including a link to your website and/or your Twitter handle. Please also include an approximate word count, and tell us how you found our journal.

The average response time for short stories is about a week, but is usually quicker. If you do not receive a response after one month, please send a follow-up e-mail. Stories are read and responded to in the order they are received.

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ARTWORK

Eurynome is regularly seeking artwork to complement our story selections. To inquire about providing an illustration for the magazine, please send the art you would like to submit, a short (2-3 sentences) biography, and a link to your portfolio (if applicable) tosubmissions@euryno.me. We accept artists of all skill levels, experience, and styles. At this time, we are unable to monetarily compensate artists. We do not commission artists, but instead accept their previously-created artwork. Artists retain their rights to submitted artwork.

Call for Submissions: Permafrost’s First Annual Book Prize in Fiction

 

 

Permafrost Magazine, the farthest north literary journal for writing and the arts, located at 64° 50′ N (198 miles from the Arctic Circle), is now accepting submissions for its First Annual Book Prize.  Check it out!

Also, take a look at the latest issue, which is out now!

We are proud to announce that we are now accepting submissions for the 1st Annual Permafrost Book Prize in Fiction!

Click here to submit!

 

Prizes:

The winner will win $1,000 and publication of their manuscript through the University of Alaska Press.

Eligibility:

We welcome manuscripts from all living writers the world over who are writing in English. Writers can be both published and unpublished. However, we will not consider manuscripts that have already been published elsewhere or have been self-published. We do accept simultaneous submissions, but please notify us immediately via email if your manuscript is accepted elsewhere. No past or present student or paid employee is eligible to enter the Book Prize Contest.

When to Submit

We are currently accepting submissions; the deadline ends on December 1, 2014.

Manuscript

Manuscripts must be a minimum of 150 pages long. All entries will be read anonymously. Please include two cover pages: the first listing only the title of the manuscript, the second including the author’s name, mailing address, telephone number, and email address. An acknowledgements page may be included also if the author wishes.

We accept only electronic submissions through our Submittable page.

Entry Fee

We ask a $20 entry fee to submit your manuscript to the contest.

Notifications

A winner should be selected by May 1, 2015. Results will be emailed shortly thereafter.

Judge

Our judge for the contest will be Benjamin Percy, whose works include Red Moon, Refresh, Refresh, The Wilding, and The Language of Elk.

Questions?

Please address inquiries to the editors at editor@permafrostmag.com.

Call for Submissions: Cake & Grapes

Another new(to me)! magazine that’s open for submissions: Cake & Grapes!  With a name like that, how can you not submit?  Check them out.

We at Cake & Grapes believe that art is anyone’s game. 

That’s why we’re opening our doors to you: to give you a chance. Flash fiction, short fiction, epic poetry, photographs, sestinas, sketches, films, paintings, sculptures, gifs, papier mache hats – we want them all. 

Show us what you’re made of, and we’ll show the world.

GUIDELINES

We don’t want to hamper your creativity; we just need to lay down some basic rules.

Prose
Short fiction, flash fiction, and non-fiction are all accepted. All prose submissions must be less than 2,500 words in length. Exceptions will only be made for essays that are relevant and irreverent.

Poetry
If humorous, epic poems will be tolerated. Otherwise, it’s fair game.

Artwork
As this is an online publication, we will only be able to accept photographs or scans of your artwork. Please be sure that your work is well-lit. We will consider original comics, sketches, sculptures, paintings, graphic designs, gifs, – you name it – for publication.

Video
All video submissions must be less than 10 minutes in length. We’re not the FCC, so no worries there.

Feel like you fit within our loose rubric?

SUBMIT!

Drowning in Truth: Lessons from Dispatches from the Drownings by B.J. Hollars

Dispatches from the Drownings: Reporting the Fiction of Nonfiction by B.J. Hollars is a deep, poignant look into the nature of nonfiction, specifically in how it relates to truth and fiction. Dispatches starts with a very necessary Author’s Note, in which Hollars explains his project:

Sticking with my ‘75/25 theory’ on the validity of facts, only seventy-five percent of the following hundred drowning dispatches are based on true accounts. The other twenty-five are completely fabricated. I have made no effort to differentiate. In fact, in an attempt to thwart the sleuthing reader, I have gone so far as to manufacture false entries in my bibliography. (Hollars, xiv)

Thus Hollars begins an exploration of where truth is found in journalism, in creative nonfiction, and in fiction and where the lines are between these three genres. Though Hollars admits that this way of going about things will be maddening for some readers, he is also clear and upfront about his truthfulness (or lack thereof). It could be argued that this ends up being more honest than most journalism, which does not discuss the writer’s own motives, how she comes to choose the facts she chooses, or what she chooses to stretch or leave out.

Dispatches is indeed a fascinating foray into the exploration of truth in writing, but it is also much more than that. I found myself unable to put the book down. This, despite the fact that Hollars himself admits that there is very little suspense in the book. Most of the stories end the same way, with a drowning. However, Hollars uses many techniques to keep the reader going. Some of these are very straightforward. The shortness of the articles, between one hundred and five hundred words pushes the reader on. The use of white space in the book keeps the articles from running together and also allows the reader that sense of moving quickly through the pages. It is, quite literally, a page-turner. The writing is also captivating, making puns or drawing conclusions so that the reader must ask: Is this Hollars or is he “paraphrasing” what was already there? So many of the articles end with eyebrow-raising lines, like the one about the man thought to have had a heart attack: “On his last swim, however, his heart was no longer in it” (Hollars, 162) or the story of the drowning of the “inmate at the feeble-minded home” which ends with “It appears as if they boy who sought independence on Independence Day found freedom at last in the river” (Hollars, 136).

Some of the things that keep the reader going, however, go deeper into the choices that Hollars made. For one, there is a great variety in the types of stories that Hollars uses. While most of the stories end in death by drowning, they don’t all. The stories vary from the rescue of a pig, to lovers’ quarrels, to mothers drowning children, to men in logging accidents. The sheer range of possibilities of ways to drown is mind-boggling. Additionally, Hollars gives us also a range of details. The articles do not simply state the name and date, etc. Some give the process of grief of survivors, some give the background of the deceased, some give insight into how mental illness was portrayed at the time, some give details about clothing, customs, or celebrations of the time period. The effect is that the reader is not reading the same story over and over again, but instead is looking through one hundred peepholes which give tiny glimpses into the lives of the people and the past. This effect is heightened by the use of photographs from that time period and place.

This array of information given and information withheld also leaves the reader with questions that keep her going through the book. What is mother’s disease? Did they ever find the body? Was that really an accident? What happened to the money? Hollars plays to these questions by very rarely giving the answers. For about four of the articles, he also gives follow-up articles that explain the story more fully. This keeps the reader going in hopes that more might be explained. It is very rare that it ever is.

Perhaps the most powerful thing that keeps the reader going is the search for truth. Knowing that twenty-five percent of the articles are not factual makes the book into a game, as if the more the reader reads, the more insight will be gained, and therefore perhaps the reader will be able to tell the “fraudulent” articles from the real ones. The reader feels as if perhaps the next article will hold clues about how to tell which stories are real, about how to read this book. True to his philosophy, Hollars never reveals which stories we may take as truth and which he fabricated. Instead of leaving the reader maddened, this has the effect of leaving the reader haunted: haunted by the drownings which may or may not have taken place, haunted that we may never know what happened, haunted by idea that truth may not be as easy to grasp as we once thought. Indeed, Hollars writes that he leaves this project with the same ghosts: “Despite all my research, I could no longer precisely recall which stories were factual and which I’d fabricated… I’ve studied the facts, I’ve fabricated the fictions, but I no longer know which me to believe” (Hollars, 184).

*This post is part of a series on the craft of writing called Reading for Writers.  This series examines a variety of authors to ascertain the choices they’ve made in their writing and the effects of those choices so that we as writers can make better decisions in our own writing.

Call for Submissions: Brilliant Flash Fiction

A shoutout to fellow wordpresser, Brilliant Flash Fiction, who is accepting submissions of (you guessed it!) flash fiction!  Their submission guidelines are below. Check them out!

 

Tell me a story in 1,000 words or less.

Email it to brilliantflashfiction@gmail.com.
If I like it, I’ll publish it in the next available edition of Brilliant Flash Fiction.

Please send original, unpublished work. If you do not receive an acceptance or rejection email within three months, I’m afraid you must assume the worst.

I accept all genres: sci-fi, memoir, historic fiction, etc.  No graphic violence or porn, please.

Be sure to paste your story into the body of your email and also attach it as a .doc file.

Please do not submit more than two stories quarterly (during a 3-month period).

At present, no payment is available. Authors will enjoy sharing their work with an appreciative audience and the possibility of having their work published in a to-be-announced anthology.

 

 

Call for Submissions: Adriadne’s Thread

Thanks to Duotrope, I’ve found this new (to me) lit mag called Ariadne’s Thread. Check them out!

 

Ariadne’s Thread publishes poetry, fiction, articles and short essays and other contents that may not be that easily classified, provided they match or complement the literary nature of the magazine.

Submission Guidelines

The Magazine tries to enforce a sof rules policy, meaning that we are always willing to make exceptions to our rules and guidelines provided the quality of the submitted content justifies it.

Please bear in mind that, due to the high volume of submissions, our response times became quite long. Though we are trying to shorten it, chances are that you will have to wait about 3 months for a reply.

General:

  • The editor’s decision is final.
  • We’ll reply to all submissions, both the accepted and the rejected ones
  • The issue for which you submit (except the theme issues) has the value of an indication. We may choose to consider your submission for another issue.
  • In principle we will only published previously unpublished material. In some specific cases, and provided we are informed, we may choose to make an exception.
  • Please don’t send more than 1 submission on each topic per issue. If you do, it will be rejected without being read.
  • We tend to favour serious over humourous and deep over light.
  • We accept simultaneous submissions if:
  • You let us know that you are doing it
  • You agree to inform us that your all or part of your submission was accepted for publication elsewhere.

Poetry:

We will consider poems of any length while admitting that our life would be easier if all poems had between 25 and 45 lines.

We tend not to enjoy poems about pets, holidays or witty, purposeless wordplay but we welcome anyone who proves us wrong.

We tend to prefer, however, the kind of well crafted poetry that is emotional, not being sentimental, that tingles both the emotions and the mind and can change the way we look at life.

Please submit 3 to 6 poems (if you submit more than 6 poems, your submission will be automatically rejected.

Fiction:

Due to its size, Ariadne’s thread can only accomodate shorter forms of fiction. Apart from that, no rules and no limitations. Challenge us and our readers.

Please submit up to a maximum of 3 stories. If you submit more than 3 stories, your submission will be automatically rejected.

Short essays and Reviews

There are no specific subject constraints but we are particularly interested in:

  • Short, compelling texts on English-language authors that are unfairly  half-forgotten
  • Texts on translated authors that should be better known
  • Challenging and thought provoking texts about the conventions we tend to blindly follow.

If you have something in mind and are not sure if it could interest us, please click here to send us your suggestion.

How to Submit:

Please use the submission form on our website.

We don’t accept  submissions by mail.

The contents need to be sent as an upload and must be in word (.doc or .docx) or Acrobat pdf format.

 If your submission is accepted

We’ll contact you, asking for your confirmation

If, and only if your submission is accepted, you will also have the option to send us:

  • a note about the texts you are submitting if you think readers will benefit from some additional information about your text.
  • a picture (size and resolution)
  • a biographic note (biographic note field)
  • an url for your website

If you choose to send us this  additional information (it is optional), we’ll display it in an author profile publicly available in this site and you will be provided with the means to edit and delete it at any time.

The notes on your submitted content will be placed under the issue in which they are published.

Copyright

By submitting you grant us the rights to publish your work in Ariadne’s Thread magazine, both in print, in electronic format and in the magazine’s web site.

After publication, the copyright of your work remains yours.

All authors published in the magazine will receive a free copy of the issue in which they appear. They will also be  invited to read at the issue’s launch.

 

Click here to submit

Using Fiction in Memoir: Maxine Hong Kinston’s The Woman Warrior

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Maxine Hong Kingston uses fiction to heighten the poignancy and power of her memoir, The Woman Warrior: Memoirs of a Girlhood among Ghosts.  Throughout the book, Kingston uses not only her own memories, but also the stories she’s been told to form for the reader a picture of her formative years and the tension she feels as she creates an identity for herself.  She uses fictional elements to speculate, draw meaning, and show her reader the effects that stories (whether they be true or not) come to bear on one’s identity.

Kingston opens her book with “No Name Woman,” a story about her aunt.  But this isn’t just any family story.  It’s one that is shrouded in mystery and silence.  Because of this secrecy, Kingston must resort to speculating to fill in the details of this story.  It’s important that she understand the details because this story is one that her mother uses as a cautionary tale.  In ruminating about the details of this story, Kingston comes up with several possible variations even ones that she admits are improbable and don’t fit.  She wrestles with understanding the details of the story so that she can find “ancestral help” (8).  However, this speculation has come to bear on Kingston’s understanding of herself as a Chinese-American woman.  Kingston shows us through these variations of the story how this family narrative has shaped her understanding of many things.  It shaped the way she understood her relationship with her parents, and with her extended family.  It shaped the way Kingston understands what it means to be Chinese and what it means to be a woman.  It shaped her relationships with men and her ideas about differing standards of beauty.  Ultimately, it shaped how Kingston came to understand her own identity.  In sharing these different versions of the story, Kingston shares with her readers her process for dealing with the story and shows the reader the impact that both the story and the silence surrounding the story have had on her.

In “Shaman” Kingston takes her storytelling even further from anything that could be seen as the “objective reality” that we normally associate with the genre of nonfiction.  The chapter starts with a ghost story from the point of view of Kingston’s mother as a schoolgirl.  In it, her mother actually wrestles with a ghost before exorcising it from the school.  In a genre bent on “honesty” and “truth,” stories like this one can be difficult for a reader to swallow.  But Kingston uses the story to show how she came to see herself living in a world full of ghosts. She says that “America has been so full of machines and ghosts — Taxi Ghosts, Bus Ghosts, Police Ghosts, Fire Ghosts, Meter Reader Ghosts, Tree Trimming Ghosts, Five-and-Dime Ghosts. Once upon a time the world was so thick with ghosts, I could hardly breathe; I could hardly walk, limping my way around the White Ghosts and their cars” (96-97). This discussion of ghosts shows the importance of Kingston’s childhood understanding of being “other” in America and allows the reader to feel the otherworldliness of that experience.  Describing that feeling and the day-to-day happenings in her life alone would not have given the same emotional impact to the reader.  By using these fictional elements, Kingston lets her reader feel along with her the supernatural, the fear, the separateness that comes with understanding herself in relation to her surroundings that way.

Kingston’s fictional storytelling reaches its apex in “White Tigers,” in which she spends nearly twenty pages telling the story of Fa Mu Lan.  However, she does not tell the story in a detached, here’s-a-story-from-my-childhood sort of way.  Nor does she tell it in a let-me-tell-you-a-historical-story-of-my heritage way.  Instead, she tells the story in first person, as she experienced it herself when she “couldn’t tell where the stories left off and dreams began” (19).  In telling this story in first person, the reader can begin to understand the impact of this story on a young Kingston and can feel the expectations and potential that Kingston would have felt as a child.  It also brings home her point when she says, “My American life has been such a disappointment” (45).  Because the reader has seen the story of Fa Mu Lan from the eyes of Kingston herself, the reader can understand on a deeper level the sense of disappointment that the author must have felt.  Finally, Kingston shows how important this story and stories in general have been in her life when she compares herself to Fa Mu Lan, “What we have in common are the words at our backs” (53).  Here she suggests that while they do not have the shared experience of going to war in ancient China, the stories that they have in common unite them.  Because of this, Kingston can use Fa Mu Lan’s story to come to a deeper understanding of herself, her experiences, and her expectations.

Throughout the book, Kingston tells her reader about listening to the talk-story of her family and the ways in which these talk-stories came to bear on her understanding of herself. She writes, “When we Chinese girls listened to the adults talk-story, we learned that we failed if we grew up to be but wives or slaves” (19). More than just telling her reader the importance of these stories on her life and memories, she shows us by telling us the stories, too. They have more weight than we usually give fictional stories because we can see how Kingston was influenced by these stories. Because we are told the stories as well, we as readers can also be influenced by them and therefore relate to Kingston and her experiences.

Though it may seem that including these non-factual stories in her memoir undermines the validity of the truth of Kingston’s memories, it actually has the effect of giving a fuller picture of her dreams, expectations, disappointments, and fears.  Without these stories, it would be more difficult for readers to understand the complexities of Kingston’s experience growing up between cultures.  These stories allow the reader to feel the dissonance between Kingston’s Chinese upbringing and her American existence.  In the same way, when writing nonfiction, we can use fictional elements and stories to give the reader a fuller picture of our experiences.  Fictional stories often hold weight in the factual world, coming to bear on the ways that people understand themselves, the places around them, and their relationships with society at large.  Using these fictional stories to give a fuller picture is especially useful in memoirs.  If we are trying to understand and to help our readers understand our experiences, the stories we tell ourselves can give more insight into how we’ve developed and come to understand ourselves.

 

*This post is part of a series on the craft of writing called Reading for Writers.  This series examines a variety of authors to ascertain the choices they’ve made in their writing and the effects of those choices so that we as writers can make better decisions in our own writing.